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Deep Philosophical Questions About Incarnate by @JodiMeadows

Incarnate

Ana is new. For thousands of years in Range, a million souls have been reincarnated over and over, keeping their memories and experiences from previous lifetimes. When Ana was born, another soul vanished, and no one knows why.

Even Ana’s own mother thinks she’s a nosoul, an omen of worse things to come, and has kept her away from society. To escape her seclusion and learn whether she’ll be reincarnated, Ana travels to the city of Heart, but its citizens are afraid of what her presence means. When dragons and sylph attack the city, is Ana to blame?

Sam believes Ana’s new soul is good and worthwhile. When he stands up for her, their relationship blooms. But can he love someone who may live only once, and will Ana’s enemies—human and creature alike—let them be together? Ana needs to uncover the mistake that gave her someone else’s life, but will her quest threaten the peace of Heart and destroy the promise of reincarnation for all?

Finally got around to reading Incarnate. Instead of adding to the many fantastic reviews out there this time, I’d thought I’d write about the thought-provoking questions the book brought up for me.

Incarnate‘s plotline is based on the idea of reincarnation. In Ana’s world, the same souls have been reincarnated over and over for 5,000 years, which leads to a lot of condiluted relationships. Your friend may become your mother who may become your lover in a span of a couple generations.

Each time a person is reborn they have a different body. Which means, you could be a different gender, fat, thin, tall, short—whatever. This makes me wonder how much our bodies are tied to our souls. How much does my gender influence my soul in real life?

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