skip to Main Content

3 Ways Sex is Portrayed in YA Books

3 Ways Sex is Portrayed in YA Books
Photo Credit: http://goo.gl/kMA5u

I recently attended a workshop on Sex in YA by the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers. It was my first workshop by them, and I didn’t want to go by myself. Solution? Beg the husbster.

“But it’s about sex!”

“It’ll be awkward. I don’t read YA.”

“But it’s about sex!”

“I don’t care. It’ll be awkward.”

“Why don’t you sit in the back and get some work done? Productivity.”

When we got there the seats were in a circle. Poor guy. He couldn’t hide.

The speaker was Bree Ervin, red-haired, smiley, owner of Think Banned Thoughts LLC, who had an intimidating stack of books behind her. A writing prompt later, we dove right into three ways sex is portrayed in YA books:

Read More

A Little Inspiration from Wool by @HughHowey

Wool Omnibus is the first in the Silo Series and is an indie phenomenon. Read the second, ShiftThe third, Dust, is available for pre-order.

WoolThis is the story of mankind clawing for survival, of mankind on the edge. The world outside has grown unkind, the view of it limited, talk of it forbidden. But there are always those who hope, who dream. These are the dangerous people, the residents who infect others with their optimism. Their punishment is simple. They are given the very thing they profess to want: They are allowed outside. 

Wool is an adult science fiction/dystopian novel. If you only read YA in this genre, you’re really missing out. From the very first line, I couldn’t put the thing down. There’s a reason why this book is a phenomenon.

I’m not going to fill you in on everything I loved about it, from the characters to the silos the characters live in underground to all the engineering details. Instead, I’m going to focus on the one thing Wool did “wrong” and why it should encourage you as a self-publisher. Don’t worry, it’s inspirational.

One of the biggest rules in writing is to stick with your point-of-view (POV) main character. Readers first bond with whoever they’re first introduced to and do not do well when the person whose head they’ve been in suddenly leave. You risk losing the reader.

Read More

Review: Legend by @Marie_Lu

Legend is the first in a trilogy. The second, Prodigy, was released earlier this year. The third, Champion, will be released in November.
LegendBorn into an elite family in one of the Republic’s wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic’s highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country’s most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths—until the day June’s brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family’s survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias’s death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.

Read More

Review: The Maze Runner by @JamesDashner

Valentine’s Day 2014, The Maze Runner is coming out as a movie. Which should give you plenty of time to read this action-packed book first. And then the rest of the trilogy. Check it out on IMBD.
The_Maze_RunnerWhen Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his first name. His memory is blank. But he’s not alone. When the lift’s doors open, Thomas finds himself surrounded by kids who welcome him to the Glade—a large, open expanse surrounded by stone walls.

Just like Thomas, the Gladers don’t know why or how they got to the Glade. All they know is that every morning the stone doors to the maze that surrounds them have opened. Every night they’ve closed tight. And every thirty days a new boy has been delivered in the lift.

Thomas was expected. But the next day, a girl is sent up—the first girl to ever arrive in the Glade. And more surprising yet is the message she delivers.

Thomas might be more important than he could ever guess. If only he could unlock the dark secrets buried within his mind.

Confession. By the end of this book, I had a major character crush on Thomas. I hope that’s okay because he’s supposed to be 16, and I’m, well, not 16 and married.

Read More

Mondays #fiction #shortstory

Mondays
Original photo found here: http://goo.gl/ksMVH

“Sarah, are you okay?” Mr. Davenport stopped her at the doorway, trig textbook in hand. “You didn’t answer questions eleven through fifteen on your quiz last Monday. I hope you didn’t skip over answers on this week’s quiz.”

“I didn’t feel very good.” Her chest had grown tight that day. The numbers blurred in front of her face, little animated Star Wars figures chasing each other round and round the page.

“The math-bowl is next week, and we need you at your best. We wouldn’t want to miss our chance for a fourth state-championship. We’re counting on you for another win.”

“Yes, sir. I’ll be ready.” She shuffled her backpack and pushed past him toward English.

What if she wasn’t ready? What if all she saw were more Star Wars figures? The hairs on the back of her neck rose. Think about it later, not now.

Read More

Review: A Million Suns by @BethRevis

A Million Suns is the second in a trilogy. Check out my review of the first, Across the Universe, and be sure to read the third, Shades of Earth.A_Million_Suns

It’s been three months since Amy was unplugged. The life she always knew is over. Everywhere she looks, she sees the walls of the spaceship Godspeed.

But there may be hope: Elder has assumed leadership of the ship. He’s finally free to act on his vision—no more Phydus, no more lies.

But when Elder learns shocking news about the ship, he and Amy race to discover the truth behind life on Godspeed. They must work together to unlock a mystery that was set in motion hundreds of years earlier. Their success—or failure—will determine the fate of the 2,298 passengers aboard Godspeed. But with each step, the journey becomes more perilous, the ship more chaotic, and the love between them more impossible to fight.

I love what Maggie Boyd wrote in her review of A Million Suns. “Growing pains can be a horrible thing, especially when those growing pains are experienced by hundreds of people.” Couldn’t have said it better myself.

Read More
Back To Top